Midwest September 2018 Summary: Rainy and Warm!

Posted: October 2, 2018, 1:10 am by jsullivan

Summer was slow to depart this September, with all locations in the Midwest finishing much warmer than average.  It was an odd month rainfall-wise as there were extended dry periods; but when it rained, it poured, with large parts of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois doubling their average rainfall for the month.

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September 2018: Unseasonable Warmth and Drenching Rains!

Posted: October 2, 2018, 12:12 am by chewitt

So much for meteorological fall! It seemed summer was quite hesitant to depart the Northeast, making September yet another record breaker in various departments. While severe weather took a back seat, unseasonable warmth, high humidity, and drenching rainfall would define what is climatologically a rather quiet month.

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Weather and Football

Posted: September 15, 2018, 8:34 am by rreale

The National Football League (NFL) has become America's most watched and largest grossing sport. Each weekend, tens of millions of people sit down and watch teams battle rain or shine, hot or cold, which adds to the intrigue of each match-up.

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Temperature Inversion Explainer

Posted: September 13, 2018, 4:48 pm by chewitt

If you happen to have a thermometer in your car (which most modern cars do), have you ever noticed that on a given winter morning when skies are clear, it reads warmer on hills? Then, when you descend into the valleys or are in a very open area that lacks development (such as the Pine Barrens), it is much colder? This kind of early morning can see 20-degree temperature swings across a relatively small region. But… why? 

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August 2018: Uncomfortably Hot and Humid

Posted: September 11, 2018, 11:56 am by chewitt

 As we close the books on meteorological summer (which ended on August 31st), probably the most memorable facet of August would not be flooding rains or record-breaking temperatures, but the extremely high levels of humidity. Many saw impressive streaks of seemingly never-ending oppressive dew points. Nonetheless, the Northeast did receive its fair share of rain and we did become immersed in a few heat waves. But what resulted from such a humid pattern? Let’s jump in.

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Atlantic Tropical Update

Posted: September 6, 2018, 8:56 am by nwiles

As Hurricane Florence barrels through the Atlantic toward the United States, it is easy to lose perspective on what the norm is for hurricane activity this time of year. That being said, it’s certainly not out of the ordinary to hear about a large number of storms churning out in the Atlantic Ocean in September. After all, it is the month of peak hurricane activity, which statistically occurs on September 10th.

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What Are The Dog Days Of Summer?

Posted: August 7, 2018, 1:27 pm by bmiller

We have all heard the phrase before, but what exactly are the dog days of summer? It's normally used to describe those hazy, hot and humid summer days (like this week). However, you may be wondering how such a unique phrase got started...and does it really have anything to do with dogs?

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July 2018: Warm & Dry in the Midwest

Posted: August 7, 2018, 10:38 am by jsullivan

The warmth we saw in May and June continued as a stretch of hot and very muggy conditions into the first week of July. This prolonged stretch of weather was a result of a large ridge in the jet stream that was firmly planted over the Ohio Valley and Northeast, which pushed the jet stream well north into Canada allowing tropical air northward.  A generally dry pattern was in place during the first week of the month, with only disorganized thunderstorms that dropped hit and miss rainfall across the Midwest.

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July 2018: Quiet, Then Much Like Florida

Posted: August 7, 2018, 10:00 am by chewitt

 Whatever heat wave we had at the beginning of July would be a lost memory by the second half of the month. Temperatures would not even really be the defining factor as excessive rainfall made the headlines, shattering records by the third and fourth week. This would all be thanks to a stark pattern shift that would send a plume of tropical weather our way.

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